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Dyna Ferrous Fumarate


DESCRIPTION:
TABLET
Colour : Brown
Shape : Round, Biconvex and Scored

Coating : Film-coated


EACH TABLET CONTAINS
Ferrous Fumarate ............................. 200 mg


PHARMACODYNAMICS
Ira essential component in the physiological formation of hemoglobin, adequate amounts of which are necessary for effective erythropoies s and the resultant oxygen transport capacity of the blood. A similar function is provided by Iron n myoglobin production. Iron also serves as a cofactor of several essential enzymes, including cytochromes that are involved in electron transport. Iron is necessary for catecholamine metabolism and the proper functioning of neurotrophils. When taken orally, in food or as a supplement, Iron passes through the mucosal cells in the ferrous state and is bound with the protein transferrin. In this form, Iron is transported in the body to bone marrow for red blood cell production.


PHARMACOKINETICS
Iron in irregularly and incompletely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, the main site absorption being the duodenum and jejenum absorption is usually increased in conditions of Iron deficiency or when given in the fasting sate. Absorption of Iron may be reduced in certain disease states. Protein binding is very high (about 90% or more).


INDICATION
For the treatment or prophylaxis of Iron deficiency anaemia.


RECOMMENDED DOSE
2 to 3 tablets daily, in divided doses, or as directed by the physician.


CONTRAINDICATION:
Except under special circumstances, this medication should not be used when the following medical problems exist: hemachromatosis or hemosiderosis. Risk-benefit should be considered when the following medical problems exist: Alcoholism, allergies, asthma, hepatic function impairment, kidney disease, intestinal tract inflammatory conditions, peptic ulcer, rheumatoid arthritis or sensitivity to Iron.


WARNING AND PRECAUTIONS
Iron salts should not be given to patients receiving repeated blood transfusions or to patients with anaemias not produced by Iron deficiency unless Iron deficiency is also present. Oral Iron therapy should not be administered concomitantly with parenteral Iron. Care should be taken when given to patients with Iron storage or Iron absorption diseases, haemoglobinopathies, or existing gastrointestinal disease. The absorption of Iron salts and tetracyclines is diminished when they are taken concomitantly by mouth. If treatment with both drugs is required, the Iron salt should be administered 2 hours before or 3 hours after the tetracycline. The absorption of iron salts may also be decreased by some antacids. Iron salts reduce the effects of penicillamine. The response to Iron may be delayed in patients receiving concomitant chloramphenicol therapy.


DRUG INTERACTIONS
Combination containing any of the following medications (depending on the a mount present) may interact with this medication: acetohydroxamic acid, alcohol, tetracyclines, etidronate, penicillamine or trientine, pancreatin or pancrelipase, dimercaprol, chelating agents, antacids and calcium or zinc supplements.


SIDE EFFECTS/ADVERSE REACTIONS
The oral administration of Iron preparations sometimes produces gastrointestinal irritation and abdominal pain with nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea or constipation.


SYMPTOMS AND TREATMENT OF OVERDOSE
Iran overdose may have corrosive effects on the gastrointestinal mucosa; necrosis and perforation may occur; stricture formation may subsequently follow. Symptoms may include epigastric pain, diarrhoea, n vomiting and haematemesis. Circulatory failure may follow if the diarrhoea and haemorrhage are severe. Hours or days later, after apparent recovery, metabolic acidosis, convulsions, and coma may occur. If the patient survives, symptoms of acute liver necrosis may develop and may lead to death due to hepatic coma. In treating Iron poisoning, speed is essential to block absorption of Iron from the alimentary tract. Wash out the stomach with a 1% solution of sodium bicarbonate as quick as possible and then to give 5 to 10 g of desferrioxamine mesylate in 50 to 100 ml of water to chalet, any Iran left in the stomach and prevent further absorption. To eliminate Iron already absorbed, 1 to 2 g of Desferrioxamine Mesylate may be given intramuscularly o intravenously by slow infusion. If desferrioxamine is not available, empty the stomach immediately by emesis and lavage using a 1 to 5% solution of Sodium Bicarbonate, and Leave up to about 300 ml of the solution in the stomach; Sodium Bicarbonate forms poorly absorbed Ferrous Carbonate with any ferrous ions. Other measures include correction of lost fluids.

 

Minerals

Unit

Infants

Children under 4 years of age

Adults and children 4

or more years of age

Pregnant & Lactating

women

Iron

mg

15

10

18

18


PACKING/PACK SIZES
Plastic container of 1000's (For EXPORT/TENDER Only).

Blister pack of 100 x 10's.


SHELF LIFE
3 years from the date of manufacture.

STORAGE CONDITIONS
KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN

Keep Container Tightly Closed

Store In A Dry

Place Below 25C

Protect From Light

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