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How to break-in a new hearing aid

Hearing aids have changed thousands of lives for the better but getting used to one isn't exactly easy. The awkward process of breaking-in a hearing aid is described by some professionals as "re-learning" how to hear. This is because you are forced to use skills you probably haven't used in years. These simple suggestions can make the transition go more smoothly and pleasantly.

Be patient with yourself. Many noises will sound more shrill than you are used to because your ears can now pick up on higher frequencies than before. For this reason, a lot of things won't sound the same as before, but you'll soon learn to recognize the new sounds.

Know your surroundings. Some environments will be easier to hear in than others. Noise in rooms with lots of hard surfaces and busy activity will he louder than rooms with lots of sound absorbers, like sofas and carpeting. Knowing where you can hear best will help you make the most of your new ability.

Learn how to use it. Have your doctor show you how to use your hearing aid. Then you'll he comfortable adjusting and maintaining it. When making adjustments, do so gradually. You'll soon learn what settings work best for certain situations.

Take things slowly. Don't start off wearing your hearing aid 24 hours a day. Take your time and build up slowly. You'll eventually get used to it. At first, you may have a feeling of fullness in your eats or think Your voice sounds hollow. Some people feel like they have a head cold. Strangely enough, these are all normal. And if it seems like too much of a hassle to put up with, keep in mind you're getting your hearing back. That ought to put a smile on your face.

     
     

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