Medical  Explorer

Custom Search

Drugs A to Z  :  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z
Medicinal Ingredients : A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Beauty Products : A  B  C  D  E  F  G  I  M  N  O  P  R  S  T  V

Aging      Allergies     Alzheimer's      Arthritis    Asthma      Bacteria   new Cancer    Chickenpox     Colds     Constipation      Diabetes      Epilepsy     Fatigue     Fever     Genetics       Haemorrhoids       newHeadaches      Hepatitis    Immunity      Infection      Insomnia       Leprosy       Menopause      Obesity      Osteoporosis     Other Diseases    Pain      PMS     Parasites     Sinusitis     newStroke     Toxicology    Urology

<<Prev





Arthritis medications
Acupuncture
Alcohol
Patients
newGeneral Health
Medicinal food
Chinese medicine
Nutrients
Smoking
Vitamins
OTC Drugs
Health Products
Therapy
Symptom
Parasitology
 
 
Household PoisonsHousehold Poisons

The majority of homes contain many products, mostly cleaners and petrol products, that can do harm if swallowed. Victims of these poisons are often children, but adults also occasionally succumb.

Something is classified as a poison if , taken into the body in sufficient quantity, it causes permanent or temporary damage. A list of such substances will include many household products -- bleach, caustic soda, fire lighters, methylated spirits, nail varnish, paint stripper, paraffin and shoe polish, for instance, can all cause distress and even death if swallowed in sufficient amounts. In the great majority of cases, the poisoning is accidental, and the victim is more often than not a child. Symptoms vary according to the poison, but include vomiting and diarrhoea, breathing difficulties, fits and delirium.

PREVENTION NOT CURE

The surest way to prevent any accidental poisoning is to keep all potentially dangerous household products in their original packaging and either locked away or on a high shelf well out of the range of children -- and definitely not under the sink. This rule applies not only in the kitchen and bathroom, but also in the garage, garden shed or any place you keep weed killers and other garden chemicals, paint thinners, a and so on.

PRIORITIES

If, despite your precautions, someone is poisoned, the first thing you should do, as in most emergencies, is to check that his airway is not blocked, that he is breathing and has a pulse. If he ahs no pulse or is not breathing, start resuscitation techniques, but be careful not to add to the casualty list by contaminating yourself with the poison. Wipe away any traces of it around his mouth and wash your hands carefully afterwards.

The next thing to do is get medical aid -- a doctor or the emergency services -- and to identify the poison. If the casualty is conscious, ask him what he has taken. If he is not, look for a bottle or other container nearby. The emergency services will want to see this. A sample of the casualty's vomit may also help analyse what he ahs taken, but be careful not to contaminate yourself collecting it.

CORROSIVE POISONS

Many household poisons, including bleach, ammonia, soda and floor, furniture and shoe polishes, are corrosive -- that is, they burn flesh and other substances with which they come into contact.

Sure signs of a corrosive poison are burns around the mouth, a white discoloration on the lips, mouth and clothes, and severe pain in the mouth, gullet and stomach.

If these are present, gently clean the affected areas with a damp sponge and remove any clothing onto which the poison or vomit has splashed. Be particularly careful when resuscitating. The pain can be eased with slow sips from a large glass of cold water or milk.

     
     

Diagnosis

Hormones

Massage

Dressing wounds

Foreign bodies

Food labelling

Caffeine

Habits

Digestion

Intensive Care

Healthy Cooking

Biopsy

Alexander technique

Minerals

Biofeedback

Speech

Comfort habits

Chest wounds

Anaesthetics

Childhood checks

Check-ups

Organ Transplants

Lasers

X-rays

Drug dependency

Microsurgery

Vegetarianism

Household Poisons

 

General Health 1

General Health 2

General Health 3

 

Abdomen
Blood
Bone
Breast
Ear

Eye

Face
Hair

Head

Heart
Kidney
Liver
Limbs
Lungs
newMind
Mouth
Muscles
Nails

Neck

newNerves
Nose

Skin

Teeth

Throat

Tongue
 
Health news
 
Cardiovascular Guide
 
Natural Remedies
 
Treatment of Cancer
 
Women's Health
 
Irritable bowel syndrome
 
Common Childhood Illnesses
 
Prescribed Drugs
 
 

     

 

Disclaimer