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GooseberriesGooseberries

 

BENEFITS

A good source of vitamin C, potassium, and bioflavonoids.

Fair amounts of iron and vitamin A.

High in fiber, low in calories.

 

DRAWBACKS

Their tartness is usually offset with large amounts of added sugar.

Gooseberry bushes harbor a fungus that kills some types of pine trees.

 

Still not very popular in North America, gooseberries are prized for their acidic tartness in Europe, where they are made into pies, jams, jellies, and sauces for poultry. New, sweeter-tasting varieties have been developed, which are more palatable for eating raw.

 

Goose berries have many nutritional benefits. They are high in fiber (about 4 g in a cup of raw berries), vitamin C (50 mg per fresh cup), and potassium (250 mg per cup). They are also rich in bioflavonoids plant pigments that help prevent cancer and other diseases. Some of these nutrients are lost in processing; a cup of canned gooseberries loses more than half of its vitamin Cm as well as some potassium. The canned berries are also high in calories, yielding 180 calories per cup, compared to 65 for the fresh fruit.

 

Folk healers in the past recommended gooseberry juice to treat liver and intestinal disorders. they also believe that a tea brewed from  the plant's leaves was a remedy for urinary tract and menstrual disorders. Old herbal medicine books refer to the fruit as feverberries and recommend it for inflammatory disorders. However, there is no scientific evidence that gooseberries or their leaves have any special medicinal qualities.

 

Gooseberries carry fungi that are transmitted to pine trees and other types of fruit bushes. as a result, efforts are now under way to develop more disease-resistant strains of gooseberries.

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