Medical  Explorer

Custom Search

Drugs A to Z  :  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z
Medicinal Ingredients : A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Beauty Products : A  B  C  D  E  F  G  I  M  N  O  P  R  S  T  V

Aging      Allergies     Alzheimer's      Arthritis    Asthma      Bacteria   new Cancer    Chickenpox     Colds     Constipation      Diabetes      Epilepsy     Fatigue     Fever     Genetics       Haemorrhoids       newHeadaches      Hepatitis    Immunity      Infection      Insomnia       Leprosy       Menopause      Obesity      Osteoporosis     Other Diseases    Pain      PMS     Parasites     Sinusitis     newStroke     Toxicology    Urology




Arthritis medications
Acupuncture
Alcohol
Patients
newGeneral Health
Medicinal food
Chinese medicine
Nutrients
Smoking
Vitamins
OTC Drugs
Health Products
Therapy
Symptom
Parasitology
 
 

Honey

 

Our inborn taste for sweet foods led Stone Age humans to forage for the sweetness of honey. Although bees were first domesticated in artificial hives in Egypt and India about 4,500 years ago, it wasn't until about A.D 1000 that beekeepers began to understand the interplay between bees and flowers that is required to produce honey.

 

Honey remained the staple sweetener in Europe until the 1500s, when granulated sugar (more easily stored and transported) became available. But sugar could not entirely replace honey's more complex flavors, and honey remains a popular food.

 

Bees native to the Americas live only in tropical zones and lack stingers. They scavenge not only in flowers but also in fruits and animal droppings to make honeys that taste strange and are often unsafe. A single Old World species, Apis mellifera, was brought to North America by colonists in the 1600s and now produces virtually all of our honey.

 

FROM FLOWERS TO HIVES

 

Plants and honey bees have a symbiotic relationship. as the bees gather nectar, they carry pollen with them from one flower to another, thus ensuring cross-fertilization. The bees concentrate the flower nectar into honey, which is stored in their hives. Honeybees also collect and store pollen, which provides developing and young worker bees with protein and vitamins similar to the nutrients in dried beans and peas. While it is food for bees, pollen does nothing for humans that legumes can't do better, and it may trigger life-threatening allergic reactions in susceptible people.

 

As sac where enzymes begin a refining and filtering process. When the bee returns to its hive, a chain of workers greets it; each one pumps the nectar in and out of the honey sac until it becomes honey concentrated enough to resist bacteria and molds. It is then stored in a comb to ripen until it is needed for food.

 

Leguminous plants, especially clover, are commonly cultivated for bee foraging. Other crops favored for the tang of the honey they produce include linden, sage, and thyme.

 

The liquid honey that is mot popular in North America is removed from the comb by centrifugation, it is then pasteurized, strained, filtered, and bottled. Solid honeys are put through controlled crystallization before packaging.

 

HONEY AS FOOD

 

Despite all the claims that honey is a wonder food, its nutritional value is very limited; honeys are mostly sugars fructose and glucose, with some sucrose. Some types provide minute amounts of B complex and C vitamins. Honey does contain some antioxidants, however, mostly polyphenols, but fruits and vegetables are much better sources. Some new studies are looking into the antimicrobial and would-healing properties of honey.

 

Volume for volume, honey is higher in calories than sugar; a tablespoon of honey contains 64 calories, compared to 46 in a tablespoon of sugar. This is partly because a tablespoon of honey weighs more than the same volume of sugar. Honey can be substituted for sugar at the ratio of 1 measure of honey for every 1 to be decreased, however, to compensate for the water that is present in honey. Breads and cakes that are sweetened with honey do stay moister than those that are baked with sugar, thanks to the water-attracting (hygroscopic) properties of honey.

Abdomen
Blood
Bone
Breast
Ear

Eye

Face
Hair

Head

Heart
Kidney
Liver
Limbs
Lungs
newMind
Mouth
Muscles
Nails

Neck

newNerves
Nose

Skin

Teeth

Throat

Tongue
 
Health news
 
Cardiovascular Guide
 
Natural Remedies
 
Treatment of Cancer
 
Women's Health
 
Irritable bowel syndrome
 
Common Childhood Illnesses
 
Prescribed Drugs
 
 

     
         
     

 

Disclaimer