Medical  Explorer

Custom Search

Drugs A to Z  :  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z
Medicinal Ingredients : A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Beauty Products : A  B  C  D  E  F  G  I  M  N  O  P  R  S  T  V

Aging      Allergies     Alzheimer's      Arthritis    Asthma      Bacteria    Cancer    Chickenpox     Colds     Constipation      Diabetes      Epilepsy     Fatigue     newFever     Genetics       Haemorrhoids       Headaches      Hepatitis    Immunity      Infection      Insomnia       Leprosy       Menopause      Obesity      Osteoporosis     Other Diseases    Pain      PMS     Parasites     Sinusitis     Stroke     Toxicology    Urology

<<Prev

Next>>




Arthritis medications
Acupuncture
Alcohol
Patients
newGeneral Health
Medicinal food
Chinese medicine
Nutrients
Smoking
Vitamins
OTC Drugs
Health Products
Therapy
Symptom
Parasitology
 
 

jam and spreads

Jams and Spreads


Jams were developed in ancient times as a means of preserving fruits that would otherwise quickly spoil. When preserved, fruits resist spoilage because they lack the water that microorganisms need in order to grow. Surface molds can be prevented by sealing homemade preserves with an airtight layer of paraffin.

 

Fruits boiled in sugar will gel via the interaction of fruit acids and pectin, a soluble fiber that is drawn out of the fruit cell walls by cooking. Apples, grapes, and most berries contain enough natural pectin; other fruits, such as apricots and peaches, need to have it added. Low-calorie, reduced-sugar jams are gelled with a special pectin that sets at lower acidity and with less sugar. These products are often sweetened with concentrated fruit juice and thickened with starches.

 

For nutritional value, there's no comparison between jams and fresh fruits, because most of the vitamin C and other nutrients in fruits are destroyed by intense cooking. While fruit preserves contain substantial amounts of pectin a soluble fiber that helps control blood cholesterol levels this benefit is offset by their high sugar content. Simple sugars, however, make jams a source of quick energy.

 

PEANUT BUTTER

The majority of the peanuts grown in North America are ground into peanut butter. The high fat content of peanuts makes them easy to grind into a paste, but the oil quickly turns rancid when exposed to oxygen and light. many commercial peanut butters are made with preservatives, stabilizers, and added salt and sugar; you can avoid these ingredients by buying fresh-ground peanut butter made solely from nuts. The oil that rises to the top of the jar can be poured off to reduce the fat content. It's best to store peanut butter in a glass container in the refrigerator, where the darkness prevents the loss of B vitamins and the cold retards oil separation. Peanut butters that don't separate usually contain hydrogenated vegetable oils. This means they are full of trans fatty acids, which are bad for the heart.

 

Peanut butter can be a valuable nutritional resource for children, who need extra dietary fat for proper growth and development. One tablespoon contains about 95 calories, with 5 g of protein, 8 g of polyunsaturated fat, and significant amounts of B vitamins, calcium, potassium, and magnesium, along with 100 mg of sodium and traces of iron and zinc.

 

OTHER SPREADS

The supermarket shelves are stocked with many types of spreads, ranging from soft processed cheese products to chocolate-flavored nut butters and whipped marshmallow. Most of the cheese-based products provide small amounts of vitamin A and calcium but are high in sodium, fat, and cholesterol. Chocolate and marshmallow spreads offer little more than calories.

 
 

Real benefits of enzyme

Get smarter with higher dose of DHA

Goodness of red yeast rice

Women and nutrition

Benefits of spirulina

Candies

Butter and Margarine

Cakes, Cookies and Pastries

Chestnuts

Food for the growing years

A consumers' guide to Chilies

Functional Foods

Grapes

Hawthorn

Ice Cream

Jams and Spreads

Juices

Nutrients in different shellfish

 

Nutrients 1

Nutrients 2

   

newAbdomen
Blood
Bone
Breast
Ear

Eye

Face
Hair

Head

Heart
Kidney
Liver
Limbs
Lungs
Mind
Mouth
Muscles
Nails

Neck

Nerves
Nose

Skin

Teeth

Throat

Tongue
 
Health news
 
Cardiovascular Guide
 
Natural Remedies
 
Treatment of Cancer
 
newWomen's Health
 
Irritable bowel syndrome
 
Common Childhood Illnesses
 
Prescribed Drugs
 
 

     

 

Disclaimer