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Exercise can minimise bone loss

Question : I AM in my mid-40s. I went for a blood test and full body check-up at a hospital recently. I was shocked when the doctor told me that I have osteoporosis. What will happen in the long term?

Answer : Osteoporosis is a silent bone disease that often develops unnoticed as there are no symptoms or discomfort and one might not know about it until a fracture occurs. This disease simply indicates that your bones are becoming fragile and more likely to break. If left untreated, osteoporosis can progress painlessly until a bone ( especially hip, spine and wrist ) breaks, which often occurs as a result of a fall.

Ageing is the prime reason responsible for osteoporosis. Bones gradually lose their density as a natural part of ageing which simply means that the older we are, the lower our total bone mass. Poor nutrition, sedentary lifestyle, smoking and excessive alcohol use have been linked to osteoporosis. A low calcium diet and too much caffeine-containing beverages ( coffee, tea and some sodas ) can cause bone loss. Besides that, those having a small frame and bone structure are at a disadvantage because it increases the chance of getting osteoporosis.

As for your condition, you should include higher amounts of calcium and vitamin D in your diet. The body needs calcium to build strong bones and to create a supply of calcium reserves. For those with osteoporosis, increasing intake of calcium and vitamin D can decrease the risk of fracture. Dairy products including milk, yoghurt and cheese are excellent sources of calcium. Vitamin D, magnesium and zinc are equally important as they enhance calcium absorption.

If you are not exercising regularly, you might want to start now because exercise can help minimise bone loss while providing many additional benefits.

 
 

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